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The Muscle Recovery Window

Posted by Dr. Robert Portman on 1/10/2019 to Performance Tip Of The Week
The Muscle Recovery Window
The 45-minute interval following exercise, is defined by the body’s sensitivity to Insulin. During the 45-minute interval, muscles are extremely sensitive to insulin, which results in an activation of multiple processes to rebuild, restore, and replenish muscle glycogen and protein. 


Why Dieting Makes You Less Fit

Posted by Dr. Robert Portman on 12/27/2018 to Performance Tip Of The Week
Why Dieting Makes You Less Fit

Most Endurance athletes are concerned about their weight and periodically diet. Since each pound contains about 3,500 calories, if we reduce caloric intake by 1,000 calories each day we lose about two pounds each week. Logically, the higher the daily caloric deficit, the faster the weight loss. Unfortunately, the faster that you drop the weight, the more muscle you lose. This observation was made by researchers at Rockefeller University. The researchers looked at the effect of daily caloric deficit on weight loss. 

 



Which Protein is Better for Recovery: Whey or Casein?

Posted by Dr. Robert Portman on 11/29/2018 to Performance Tip Of The Week
Which Protein is Better for Recovery: Whey or Casein?
The enormous benefits of adding protein to a sports and recovery drink are well-documented. However, all protein is not the same. The specific properties of a protein are dependent on its amino acid profile. A question often raised in sports nutrition is whether whey or casein is more effective in a recovery drink. To answer this question researchers conducted a study looking at the effect of casein or whey recovery beverages on rehydration, an essential element of the muscle recovery process.

Recovery Is More Essential As We Age

Posted by Dr. Robert Portman on 10/30/2018 to Performance Tip Of The Week
Recovery Is More Essential As We Age
As endurance activity participation rates increase among senior athletes, an understanding of why recovery is more difficult as we age is essential. Previous data suggested that masters athletes recover at similar rates to younger athletes. But this appears not to be the case. Older athletes experience greater muscle damage which results in a longer recovery.

Exercise And Your Gut

Posted by Dr. Robert Portman on 10/30/2018 to Performance Tip Of The Week
Exercise And Your Gut
A great deal of research demonstrates that your intestinal bacteria (microflora) play a significant role in your overall health. Similarly, we now know that exercise has a positive impact on a host of health parameters including cardiovascular and mental health, to name just a few. A recently published study adds gut health to the many benefits that accrue from a regular exercise program.  Investigators at the University of Illinois looked at the effect of exercise on the composition of the bacterial population found in the gut. They found that exercise induces functional changes in the gut microflora.

Does a High Fat, Low Carb Diet Improve Endurance Performance?

Posted by Dr. Robert Portman on 10/8/2018 to Performance Tip Of The Week
Does a High Fat, Low Carb Diet Improve Endurance Performance?
The argument that a high-fat low-carb diet improves endurance performance is compelling. The average endurance athlete has about 2,000 calories of glycogen in their muscles. Even the leanest marathoner has close to 50,000 calories of fat. It makes sense that increasing fat consumption at the expense of carbohydrate, would lead to extended endurance since more fuel would be available to working muscles. Many trainers and nutritionists promote this proposition. Increase the fat, reduce the carbs and exercise performance goes up. Unfortunately, the scientific evidence does not support this proposition.

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